Tag Archives: genealogy

New technology solves digital overload for family memories

OurHive LOGO onlySan Diego, CA, December 14, 2015 — /EPR NETWORK/ — Have you ever had the issue of looking for a specific photo and can’t find it? You
thumb scroll endlessly but there’s no effective way to sift through all those photos every time you’re looking for something specific.

OurHive™ is the newest family app that combines patented technology and a private family network to deal with this growing issue of digital overload. The app is now live on Google Play, the App Store and as a Web App at www.GetOurHive.com.

OurHive combines the best features of a photo and video application with a private social network created especially for families. With the OurHive app, family photos and videos can be automatically tagged, organized and instantly shared with only the people you care most about. Once a private Hive is created, family members can upload and share photos and videos with each other using their iPhones, iPads, Android phones, tablets, laptops or desktop computers. All files are archived in high resolution and can be viewed and downloaded anytime.

“For many families, life is full of sacred moments that should be treasured and preserved for generations to come,” said Stephen D. Rosen, co-founder and Chief Visionary Officer of OurHive. “Today’s digital world has made sharing information convenient, but too often that sharing is made with impersonal detachment. OurHive is for people who appreciate the special intimacy that comes with sharing special memories.”

Photo and video sharing within mass-market social networks can sometimes be compromised by unauthorized use and manipulation of media. Special attention has been made with OurHive’s cloud interface to ensure the best security. Photos and videos are encrypted every step in the journey from devices to OurHive servers and back again, and the content can only be accessed by invited, password-protected members.

Because archiving and tracking family photo albums is important, the OurHive app was designed to make tagging and organization simple and accessible. Every photo and video you take with the iOS or Android app ‘automagically’ adds a caption and location from your calendar, along with the closest address when GPS is enabled. You can then edit the filename, add tags and captions and give your photos the same context that writing on the back in ink used to for print photographs.

“Whether it’s your child’s first birthday or grandma’s retirement party, OurHive encourages the family to share all of the pictures and videos they take — not just a few chosen ones that you put on Facebook or Instagram,” said Jeff Symon, co-founder and president. “With OurHive, anyone in your Hive can download any picture they want from any of their internet-connected devices. No more having to remember to text or email individual photos later.”

How OurHive Works

Starting your own Hive begins with one family member starting a free 20GB Family Hive by visiting GetOurHive.com or downloading the “OurHive” app on Google Play and the App Store. They can then invite as many family members or close friends as they want into their secure, private Hive. Each user can then download the free app on the iOS or Android device of their choice and start contributing and sharing family memories.

OurHive™ automatically stores your photos and videos in high resolution in your own private network. Anyone in your family Hive can download anytime they want and future updates will allow for even more functionality.

Visit us a www.GetOurHive.com to sign up and learn more, and join the conversation athttps://www.facebook.com/getourhive

Contact-Details: Kyle Strickland – kyle@ourhive.biz
www.GetOurHive.com

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Findmypast.co.uk To Publish Canterbury Cathedral Records Online

findmypast.co.uk, a leading UK family history website, has announced that it has been awarded a contract by Canterbury Cathedral Archives to publish historic records from the archive online. The first phase of the Canterbury Collection project will see an online version of the parish registers of the historic Archdeaconry of Canterbury, to be published in the coming weeks at findmypast.co.uk.

An estimated 270,000 images containing over a million entries will be published on the website, covering parish churches from a wide expanse of East Kent, including:
– the city of Canterbury
– the towns of Faversham, Wye and Elham
– Thanet
– towns along the east Kent coast stretching from Whitstable in the north round to Hythe in the south

The launch has been timed to coincide with the temporary closure of Canterbury Cathedral Archives for refurbishment, so that family historians and local historians can continue to enjoy access to these fascinating records until the Archives reopens in autumn 2012.

From the initial online launch in February, visitors to the findmypast.co.uk website will be able to browse through the scanned pages of the parish records to search for their ancestors. At the same time, findmypast.co.uk will start to transcribe the records, with a view to creating an index and making them fully searchable on the website later this year.

Paul Nixon, Content Licensing Manager for findmypast.co.uk, said: “We’re really looking forward to seeing these invaluable records from Canterbury Cathedral Archives go live on findmypast.co.uk, strengthening the site’s position as the natural home for UK parish records.”

Canterbury Cathedral Archivist Cressida Williams, added: “Working with findmypast has provided us with a wonderful opportunity to expand access to these records to a worldwide audience. This resource will be a great asset for anyone with an interest in the history of this part of Kent.”

The Canterbury Collection will join an impressive array of UK parish records at findmypast.co.uk, including records from Manchester Archives, Cheshire Archives, Plymouth & West Devon Record Office and Welsh Archives, in addition to over 40 million parish records from family history societies throughout the UK in partnership with the Federation of Family History Societies.

Anyone wishing to be notified when the Canterbury Collection becomes available can register online at findmypast.co.uk to receive a newsletter.

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Findmypast.co.uk Reveals Unusual Discoveries From Cheshire ‘s Local Records

Findmypast.co.uk has announced several unique discoveries found in the newly available local records from Cheshire. Workhouse records, parish registers, bishop’s transcripts and electoral registers from Cheshire went online for the first time ever recently in what findmypast.co.uk has titled ‘The Cheshire Collection.’ The collection is a series of over 10 million historic records provided by Cheshire Archives and Local Studies, covering over 350 years of history.

Some of the most interesting findings contained within The Cheshire Collection include:

– Lewis Carroll’s baptism was in Daresbury on11 July 1832
– An earthquake hit Cheshire on 18 March 1612
– Ancestors of James Bond actor Daniel Craig sold coal and were iron moulders

An unusual occurrence revealed in the records was the ‘peculiar marriage’ between Daniel Broadbent and Martha Cheetham in Mottram-in-Longdendale on 9 March 1780. Daniel was 23 and Martha was 83 years old. However, fate soon intervened to part this unlikely couple with the Mottram registers for the following year showing that Daniel Broadbent of Hattersley was buried on 30 May 1781. Furthermore, on 6 May 1776, 105 year-old George Harding married Jane Darlington, 75, at St Oswald, Chester.

These unusual marriage records show that, in the 18th century, one could find love at any age. However, the records also reveal a darker side of Cheshire’s past, telling several tales of death from the plague.

In 1625 the UK was hit by an outbreak of the plague which killed 35,000 people. Malpas in Cheshire was badly affected and the online records reveal harrowing accounts of those who were killed by the disease. One such example is that of Richard Dawson of Bradley, whose story, found among The Cheshire Collection, goes as follows:

“…being sick of the plague and perceiving that he must die at that time arose out of his bed and made his grave and caused his nephew to cast straw into the grave… and went and lay him down in the said grave, and caused clothes to be laid upon and so departed out of this world… he died about 28th august, this much I was credibly told.”

Family history records from the ancestors of Daniel Craig and the discovery of the Cheshire earthquake surprised Debra Chatfield, marketing manager at findmypast.co.uk. She commented: “These records make it possible for family historians and local history researchers to delve as far back as 1538, unearthing all sorts of unusual finds quickly and easily at their fingertips. Who would have known that Cheshire was hit by an earthquake in 1612 or that James Bond’s ancestors sold lumps of coal?”

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Findmypast.co.uk Launches More New Records And Lowers Prices

Findmypast.co.uk, a leading UK family history website, has been adding to its existing collection of over 40 million parish records for England & Wales dating back to 1538.

The company has launched over 18,000 baptism, marriage and burial records from London & Kent dating from 1825-1871, covering the parishes of Greenwich and Rotherhithe.

These follow hot on the heels of 79,842 parish records from Gwent (formerly Monmouthshire), spanning the years 1634 to 1933, which were also published on the site recently. These records cover the parishes of Chepstow, Shirenewton, Bedwellty, Beaufort, Mynddislwyn and Risca. Monmouth workhouse baptisms and burials are also included. Gwent Family History Society are providing these records on findmypast.co.uk as part of an on-going project between findmypast.co.uk and the Federation of Family History Societies to publish more parish records online, making it possible to trace back ancestors long before the start of civil registration in 1837.

20,000 burial records from the St Mary parish of Lambeth for 1819-1838 were also published online at findmypast.co.uk, supplied by East Surrey Family History Society, along with 128,000 burial records for the years 1802-1846 from the East Kent Burial Index.

Findmypast.co.uk has also announced the lowering of its prices, with full, annual subscriptions to the website, which allow access to all the historical records on the site, and annual foundation subscriptions both now cheaper than ever before. Both include the complete 1911 census for England & Wales.

Paul Yates, Head of findmypast.co.uk said: “We’re committed to making family history as affordable as possible, while still ensuring that we continue to deliver a steady stream of fascinating, new family history records to our customers every month.”

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Findmypast.co.uk Makes Birth Records Even Easier To Search

Findmypast.co.uk, leading UK family history website, has launched an easier way to find the births of English and Welsh ancestors online. The company has re-indexed over 100 million birth records dating from 1837 to 2006.

Findmypast.co.uk’s fully re-indexed birth records make finding ancestors much simpler and includes: search results in the form of a list of individual names; the ability to search the complete 1837-2006 set of birth records in one go or by one or more counties at a time; new high quality images; smart search features including variations of a name; records of children unnamed at registration; and searching by mother’s maiden name at the same time to help find the most elusive births.

With this new resource now available, findmypast.co.uk has uncovered some interesting facts about the births that were registered between 1837 and 2006: 10 babies named Fish Fish born between 1840 and 1883, bizarrely, all in Lancashire. The list includes one Fish Fish Fish born in Blackburn in 1864; Just five Ringos were registered in 1964 and 1965, compared with 2,414 Georges, 36,877 Johns and 56,170 Pauls; six Dick Turpins were registered between 1854 and 1916; four Maradonas were registered in 1986, the year of the infamous ‘Hand of God’ goal; eight Peles were registered between 1970 and 1972, following the footballer’s 1000th goal in 1969.

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