Category Archives: Database

Axiomatics offers fine-grained policy-based access control and dynamic data masking and filtering

CHICAGO, Oct-05-2017 — /EuropaWire/ — Axiomatics, the leader in fine-grained dynamic authorization, today announced that KuppingerCole has profiled its data-centric dynamic authorization suite in a recent analyst report titled, “Executive View – Axiomatics Data Security.” The report sheds light on two flagship products; Axiomatics Data Access Filter for Multiple Databases and Axiomatics SmartGuard™ for Big Data, both of which apply an Attribute Based Access Control mechanism across different types of data stores, and centralizes policy-based authorization rules for access to the content within these data stores.

KuppingerCole’s Executive View describes the solutions in detail and offers advice to IT professionals looking for data-centric security. The Axiomatics Data Access Filter offers policy-based access control and dynamic data masking and filtering for relational databases. Implemented as a database proxy, the product intercepts all connections to the database from any user or application and analyzes every SQL statement for potential violations of applicable security policies. In accordance to the ABAC approach, the authorization service may query multiple attribute sources for additional context information needed for a fine-grained access decision.

SmartGuard™ for Big Data (the most recent addition to Axiomatics’ data security portfolio) extends ABAC-based dynamic authorization to Hadoop Big Data stores. There’s a growing need to ensure consistent fine-grained access control and maintain regulatory compliance for Hadoop. These infrastructures often comprise multiple loosely coupled components, and Big Data stores are used to store massive amounts of data from numerous sources with multiple applications accessing them simultaneously. Utilizing ABAC for transparent dynamic access control to a Big Data store for multiple analytics applications allows enterprises to combine all the benefits of a single data warehouse with the traditional siloed approach, where each application has access only to its own data silo.

“For years, we have been tracking the information security market. As data security threats rise, Axiomatics continues to lead by offering solutions that help companies with fine-grained policy-based access control and dynamic data masking and filtering. Axiomatics Data Access Filter for Multiple Databases and Axiomatics SmartGuard™ for Big Data are a natural expansion of the company’s comprehensive suite of dynamic authorization solutions,” said Alexei Balaganski, lead analyst for KuppingerCole and author of the report. “Whether deployed standalone or as a part of an enterprise-wide ABAC infrastructure, these products provide an additional dynamic security and access control layer around multiple data stores transparently and without any application changes.”

“Our relentless focus on solving the toughest problems in data-centric security, have made Axiomatics the choice for IT professionals and companies looking for data security solutions to complex big data environments,” said Gerry Gebel, vice president of business development at Axiomatics. “We are honored to have such a distinguished analyst like KuppingerCole continue to review our suite of products. Their reports further underscore its commitment to delivering cutting-edge information on data security in the era of digital transformation.”

For more information about Axiomatics, visit www.axiomatics.com. For more information on KuppingerCole, visit https://www.kuppingercole.com.

SOURCE: EuropaWire

Armadillo Business Information celebrates 20 years on the Web

Hertfordshire, UK, 2017-Jun-09 — /EPR INTERNET NEWS/ — Armadillo, the world’s first web based company information database, celebrated its 20th anniversary on June 3rd.

In 1995, based near Old Street roundabout in London, Emmanuel Cohen, Armadillo’s chairman started on the road to launch an online company data system.

Having been shown the web in April 95 by a research scientist after Tim Berners-Lee uploaded the web structure in CERN, on a subsequent visit to the bookshop, Barnes and Noble he was shown all the books on this new area.

“Imagine a huge row bookshelves, devoted to a subject that was completely new. I knew then that it was important”

Manny continues “I will always remember a weekend in November 1996 when I had to make a huge decision. I could only afford the development work on one of the access systems at the time, it was a massive gamble. Should I risk everything – my business, my house, the lot – on chasing the dream of my own online database? I decided the web was the future so I gambled everything I had. Nowadays it is hard to imagine what a risk that was. Back then, the web was untried and untested as a commercial tool.”

“It amuses me that Old Street (known as Silicon Roundabout) where we started is today a burgeoning centre for web companies. These days developers are working on a tried and tested platform. It just was not there back in the mid 90s when we launched. It was true disruptive technology.”

“I was told recently that I must be the founding father of the Shoreditch Fintech revolution. Well, I don’t know about that, but my team and I certainly helped develop the bar revolution in the area!”

What Manny and his team pioneered at the time, was a unique commercial web database. Worldwide company reports and documents could be instantly bought by account or credit card from anywhere in the world, delivered to anywhere in the world. Users could also order the registration of companies online. The system was launched at the Barbican Solicitors Exhibition in London in June 1997.

“It was an amazing feeling. Once launched, we went out to our clients to sell the new service. Guess what they all said. “The internet? Too slow, no security, we can never connect – it will never catch on!”

Happy Birthday Armadillo and congratulations on the first and longest running online corporate commercial database on the web. Manny concludes ” Guess what, we haven’t stopped. We’re still innovating and are working on lots of new projects, so watch this space!”

For the full story, go to : http://news.rmonline.com/chairman/

About Armadillo Business Information:
• 1997 First company information online supplier to launch on the Web
• 1998 First to offer Trade Mark searching on the Web
• 1999 First to offer direct access to UK’s Companies House Direct
• 2011 First mobile app of its kind

Leading provider of online data to financial, legal and commercial markets.

Coverage includes 250 million companies from 200 countries around the world.

All instantly available online or via their app on a transactional (credit card) or subscription basis.

For more information please contact sales@armadillo.co.uk or call +44 (0)20 7729 1234

Issued on behalf of:
Armadillo Business Information Ltd, a member of the RM Group®,
Invision House,
Wilbury Way,
Hitchin,
SG4 0TW
Registered as a Limited Company in England and Wales No. 03222303. ISO 9001 registration numbers: GB2003315.

Website: www.armadillo.co.uk

Contact-Details: julia.kanger@armadillo.co.uk
01462427300

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

LC Sciences Launches Online Searchable Knowledgebase

LC Sciences, LLC, a leading provider of microRNA analysis services, today announced the launch of a new online searchable knowledgebase that researchers can use to locate technical information on the company’s website. This announcement comes on the heels of the launch of LC Sciences’ re-designed company website last week. The knowledgebase contains technical information in the form of application notes, technical bulletins, customer publications, presentations, reviews of seminal publications in the field, etc. This documents database contains over one thousand entries and encompasses a wide range of research fields; from plant science to neuroscience. Additionally, all entries have been carefully meta-tagged to improve search results.

“Having served the microRNA research community for the past nine years, we’ve accumulated quite a large library of reference documents such as application notes and related customer publications. This new resource offers the community a simple, user friendly search interface that makes it easier for them to locate the information they’re looking for within that library.” – Chris Hebel (Vice President of Business Development, LC Sciences)

The knowledgebase is freely accessible to all at:http://www.lcsciences.com/Knowledgebase/

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

ProMarketing Leads Now Offers an Automobile Database To Customers

ProMarketing Leads adds an automobile database that includes millions of records and is the largest available Automobile Owners database in the industry. It is compiled, updated and verified through transactional information each month.  These are known automobile owners.

Don’t get fooled into using data that is outdated and inaccurate.  We dare you to compare us to the competition. Pro Marketing Leads promises to save you money and increase your ROI. Our file consistently outperforms other Automobile files for accuracy, counts and response rates.

This Automobile Owner Database is not derived from state motor vehicle and therefore not subject to the Shelby Act/Driver’s Privacy Protection Act of 2000.

ProMarketing Leads automobile database offerscustomers…

  • Aftermarket Promotions:  Auto dealers, manufacturers and specialty stores target consumers based on automobile make/model/year and owners age and/or income information. ProMarketing Leads offers an integrated database of consumer, vehicle, email, and telephone information. This comprehensive database is able to generate great  marketing lists.
  • Service Center Programs: Dealer repair centers, specialty service centers and independent service centers can market customers based upon make, model, year, and address criteria.
  • Extended Vehicle Warranty Programs: Consumers are holding onto vehicles for a longer period of time, and may need additional insurance against future service repairs. Taylor Direct makes it easy to find vehicle owners based upon age of the vehicle, mileage and address information
  • Dealer Trade-In Programs: Many dealers seek specific vehicles based on trade-in values and demand.  Our true owners file allows dealers to target make/model/year that are currently owned within a certain radius of their dealership and base an offer on this information.

Key Features: 200 Million VINs, 160 Million Current Owners, 180 Million Addresses, 82 million telephone numbers, Select by Year, Select by Make, Select by Model, Select by mileage, Select by Engine type, Select by Auto Class, Fuel Type, Style, Income Gender, Home Ownership, and Many more selections available…ask!!

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

Findmypast Reveals The Greatest Political Leaders With Irish Ancestry

Findmypast has announced that John F. Kennedy has been voted the greatest political leader with Irish ancestry, ahead of Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama. Che Guevara, the Latin American revolutionary who also had Irish roots, ranked fourth.

The online poll of over 4,000 Americans and Britons was conducted by YouGov for the genealogy site findmypast.com and its Irish partner, findmypast IE.

“The most surprising people turn out to have Irish ancestry,” says Cliona Weldon, spokesperson for findmypast.ie, which marks its first birthday this month.

The findmypast poll asked respondents in the U.S. and UK to pick from a list of 10 political leaders who had won prominence in countries beyond Irish shores – in short, in the Irish diaspora.

This diaspora, consisting of Irish emigrants and their descendants, is estimated to include over 80 million people worldwide, including some 40 million Americans.

While Obama and JFK polled similar percentages with U.S. and UK respondents, averaging 12% and 25% respectively, Reagan polled nearly four times as many votes in the U.S. (35%) as in the UK (8%). Indeed, he would have topped the poll based on U.S. votes alone, while the UK alone ranked him third behind Obama.

Obama, who only discovered his Irish roots in 2007, is just one of at least 13 U.S. presidents to have had Irish ancestry. Indeed, the only one of the last six to have lacked them was Bill Clinton, who tried to atone for the fact by once informing a St Patrick’s Day gathering that: “I feel more Irish every day!” Other countries to have boasted notable leaders with Irish ancestry include Canada, Australia, France, Spain, Mexico, Chile, Peru and Israel.

Che Guevara, the Argentine-born radical who helped lead the revolution in Cuba, may be best known today as an icon of Latin American rebellion but he traced his ancestry to Galway, Ireland in the 1740s.

JFK and Reagan both traced their roots to the great wave of Irish emigration that began in the mid-19th century, coinciding with the great Famine.

By then, Obama’s Irish forebear, Falmouth Keaney, had already been in the U.S. for eight years, after migrating from Moneygall in Co. Offaly in 1850. Keaney was Obama’s maternal great-great-great grandfather.

About findmypast.ie:
findmypast.ie is the world’s most comprehensive Irish family history website, providing easy-to-search, online access to some of the most significant Irish records that have ever been made available, including extensive BMD records.

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

Findmypast.ie helps to reveal Dracula was Irish not Transylvanian

findmypast.ie has conducted research on Bram Stoker’s family tree which sheds new light on how he created the gothic horrors of Dracula.

Count Dracula, the Transylvanian nobleman and daddy of all vampires, was originally Irish rather than Transylvanian, according to new research by the family historian who previously traced Barack Obama’s Irish roots, Fiona Fitzsimons.

Dracula is the title character of the 1897 Gothic horror novel by Bram Stoker, the Irish writer who died 100 years ago, on April 20, 1912.

Many historians have wondered how Stoker, a one-time Dublin civil servant and chum of Oscar Wilde came to imagine the gothic horrors of Dracula and now, new research into Stoker’s family tree by the genealogy website findmypast.ie provides the answer. The new findings are the fruit of months of research by Fiona Fitzsimons, a director of findmypast.ie and the historian who last year identified Obama’s closest living Irish relatives, enabling the U.S. President to meet them on his state visit to Ireland.

Bram Stoker turns out to have been of an old family with a glorious history. His direct ancestor, Manus “The Magnificent” O’Donnell, once ruled much of Ireland and led a rebellion against Henry VIII.

“We have discovered that Bram Stoker could trace his own direct family line back almost 1,000 years,” said Fitzsimons. In short, his own lineage turns out to have been remarkably similar to Dracula’s.

Fitzsimons added: “Stoker did not use overtly Irish references in Dracula, but his main theme is taken from Irish history – the history, we now learn, of his own family – recast in the writer’s imagination.”

Although the Stoker family on Bram’s father’s side were of humble stock, it was already known before now that Bram’s mother Charlotte was descended from the Blakes, a landed Irish family.

What Fitzsimons has now discovered, with the help of land records found on findmypast.ie, is that Charlotte also descended from the O’Donnells, one of Ireland’s greatest families, with one of its oldest recorded lineages.

The story goes back farther still; from 561 A.D. the O’Donnell lords were the hereditary keepers of the psalter (holy book) of St Columba, revered in Ireland as the patron saint of poets.

These objects remained in the O’Donnell’s keeping until 1843, when they were given to the Royal Irish Academy. Their donation received wide press coverage and was a cause célèbre.

Fitzsimons said: “Our research has proven links between the writer’s family, the oldest surviving Irish manuscript in existence, and one of the greatest treasures held in the National Museum of Ireland. The manuscript book and its reliquary provide evidence that Stoker’s O’Donnell family could trace their direct lineage back more than 1,300 years to 561 A.D.”

Fitzsimons believes the true inspiration for Dracula was Manus the Magnificent, Stoker’s direct ancestor.

This is not to say that Manus was either a vampire or a tyrant, since he was neither, but he was a feudal leader with great power over much of the country and hisheroics in gory battle are just as likely an inspiration for Dracula as any historical figure.

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

Findmypast.co.uk Publishes Crew Records From The Titanic For The First Time

New analysis from findmypast.co.uk of the records of those on board the Titanic when it sunk suggests it could have been doomed from the start according to sailor superstitions.*

Six maritime myths rang true on that ill-fated day of 15th April 1912, including the presence of women, priests and red-heads on board the ship, according to the most comprehensive set of Titanic passenger and crew records launched online at findmypast.co.uk, a leading family history website.

Debra Chatfield, family historian at findmypast.co.uk, commented: “The records going live indicate sailor superstitions were wholly ignored on the Titanic’s doomed departure from Southampton. Throughout history sailors have been proverbially superstitious, but I bet few ever believed the ‘unsinkable’ Titanic would succumb to superstition. It leaves you wondering whether the cumulative effect of women, priests, dogs, barbers, flowers and red-heads on board – all commonly held superstitions among sailors – angered the sea so much it steered her towards her ill fate.”

The Unlucky Six Sailor Superstitions are:
– Women on board – 353 female passengers
– Dogs near tackle – 5 dogs reported rescued
– Priests on board – 5 men of religion
– Cutting hair on board – 3 barbers
– Flowers – 2 crew members with flower tattoos
– Red-heads – 2 on board; one crew member & the infamous Violet Jessop

Maritime birth, marriage and death records in association with The National Archives and White Star Line Officers’ books, are being launched online for the first time at findmypast.co.uk, sitting alongside the Titanic Passenger Lists and Merchant Navy recordswhich are already available to view.

Janet Dempsey, Maritime Records Specialist at The National Archives, commented:
“Death At Sea was an occupational hazard for those who made their living on the water but this rarely deterred mariners. Many who survived the Titanic went on to serve throughout the First World War and some even into WW2. The BMD registers really illustrate just how hard life was at sea even for those men and women who served on luxury liners that were just not expected to sink. With death so common place it was hardly surprising that seafarers were a superstitious lot.”

And still, 100 years on from the sinking of the Titanic, Brits are as superstitious as ever, especially when it comes to seafaring. One in eight (12%) is aware of the myth around un-christened ships bringing bad luck – something speculation famously claims about the Titanic – while the most well-known superstition for a third of Brits (31%) is an unbroken bottle during the christening of a ship.

Today’s Brits call on a number of superstitions for good luck and safe travel when embarking on a trip. Avoiding travel on Friday 13th takes the top spot (6%), followed by carrying a lucky charm such as a coin (4%), spring cleaning the house before travelling, and wearing a lucky item of clothing (2%).

Debra Chatfield concluded: “We can’t lead our lives based on myth and superstition, whether travel-related or otherwise, but in hindsight when considering the tragedy of the Titanic, it certainly is an eerie thought.”

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

Findmypast.co.uk Publishes Westminster Parish Records Online

findmypast.co.uk, a leading UK family history website, has published online for the very first time parish records held by the City of Westminster Archives Centre. The Westminster Collection at findmypast.co.uk comprises fully searchable transcripts and scanned images of the parish registers, some of which are over 400 years old.

The 1,365,731 records launched cover the period 1538-1945 and come from over 50 Westminster churches including St Anne, Soho, St Clement Danes, St George Hanover Square, St James Westminster, St Margaret Westminster, St Martin-in-the-Fields, St Mary-le-Strand, St Paul Covent Garden.

Debra Chatfield, family historian at findmypast.co.uk, said: “The Westminster Collection is one of the largest regional parish record collections we have ever published online and contains some truly wonderful gems. Family historians, wherever they are in the world, can now search this historical goldmine and uncover the fascinating stories of their London ancestors.”

The launch marks the start of a painstaking project to preserve digitally the City of Westminster Archives Centre’s collection, and sees the first tranche of its baptisms, marriages and burials go online. The remaining records are set to go live over the coming months, along with cemetery registers, wills, rate books, settlement examinations, workhouse admission and discharge books, bastardy, orphan and apprentice records and charity documents.

Adrian Autton, Archives Manager at Westminster Archives commented: “The launch of the Westminster Collection is of huge significance making Westminster records fully accessible to a global audience. This resource will be of immense value to anyone whose ancestors lived in Westminster and to anyone wishing to study the rich heritage of this truly great city.”

The records can now be searched free of charge by visiting the Life Events (BMDs) section at findmypast.co.uk, and then selecting parish baptisms or marriages or burials. Transcripts and images can be viewed with PayAsYouGo credits, vouchers or a full subscription to findmypast.co.uk.

The new Westminster Collection at findmypast.co.uk joins a growing resource of official parish records from local archives, including Cheshire Archives & Local Studies, Manchester City Council and Plymouth and West Devon Records Office, with many more in the pipeline and due to go live in the coming months. In addition over 40 million parish records from family history societies can be found at findmypast.co.uk in partnership with the Federation of Family History Societies.

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

Findmypast.co.uk To Publish Canterbury Cathedral Records Online

findmypast.co.uk, a leading UK family history website, has announced that it has been awarded a contract by Canterbury Cathedral Archives to publish historic records from the archive online. The first phase of the Canterbury Collection project will see an online version of the parish registers of the historic Archdeaconry of Canterbury, to be published in the coming weeks at findmypast.co.uk.

An estimated 270,000 images containing over a million entries will be published on the website, covering parish churches from a wide expanse of East Kent, including:
– the city of Canterbury
– the towns of Faversham, Wye and Elham
– Thanet
– towns along the east Kent coast stretching from Whitstable in the north round to Hythe in the south

The launch has been timed to coincide with the temporary closure of Canterbury Cathedral Archives for refurbishment, so that family historians and local historians can continue to enjoy access to these fascinating records until the Archives reopens in autumn 2012.

From the initial online launch in February, visitors to the findmypast.co.uk website will be able to browse through the scanned pages of the parish records to search for their ancestors. At the same time, findmypast.co.uk will start to transcribe the records, with a view to creating an index and making them fully searchable on the website later this year.

Paul Nixon, Content Licensing Manager for findmypast.co.uk, said: “We’re really looking forward to seeing these invaluable records from Canterbury Cathedral Archives go live on findmypast.co.uk, strengthening the site’s position as the natural home for UK parish records.”

Canterbury Cathedral Archivist Cressida Williams, added: “Working with findmypast has provided us with a wonderful opportunity to expand access to these records to a worldwide audience. This resource will be a great asset for anyone with an interest in the history of this part of Kent.”

The Canterbury Collection will join an impressive array of UK parish records at findmypast.co.uk, including records from Manchester Archives, Cheshire Archives, Plymouth & West Devon Record Office and Welsh Archives, in addition to over 40 million parish records from family history societies throughout the UK in partnership with the Federation of Family History Societies.

Anyone wishing to be notified when the Canterbury Collection becomes available can register online at findmypast.co.uk to receive a newsletter.

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

Findmypast.ie announces 1.2 million Irish Petty Session Records now searchable online

findmypast.ie, the Irish family history website, has launched the Petty Sessions Order Books (1850-1910) online for the first time, one of the greatest untapped resources for those tracing their Irish roots.

The original Petty Sessions records are held at the National Archives of Ireland were scanned by Family Search and have now been transcribed and made fully searchable by findmypast.ie. They cover all types of cases, from allowing trespass of cattle to being drunk in charge of an ass and cart. These were the lowest courts in the country who dealt with the vast bulk of legal cases, both civil and criminal. This first batch of entries contains details of 1.2 million cases, with most records giving comprehensive details of the case including: name of complainant, name of defendant, names of witnesses, cause of complaint, details of the judgement, details of a fine if any, and details of a sentence passed down if any. Another 15 million cases are to follow throughout 2012.

This first batch of records is particularly useful for areas of the country for which family history records are notoriously sparse such as Connaught and Donegal.

The reasons for cases being brought before the Petty Sessions Court are incredibly varied, but unsurprisingly the most common offence was drunkenness, which accounted for over a third of all cases. The top five offences tried before the courts were:
Drunkenness – 33%
Revenue/Tax offences – 21%
Assault – 16%
Local acts of nuisance – 5%
Destruction of property – 4%

The nature of these cases was significantly different from those in England. Figures show that the rate of conviction for drunkenness was three times greater, four times greater for tax offences, 65% higher for assault, and twice as likely for “malicious and wilful destruction of property” than that of our nearest neighbours*.

The records are full of the minor incidents which are representative of the vast majority of cases which were brought before the Resident Magistrates. For example, Michael Downey of Athlone, Co. Westmeath was charged with being “drunk while in charge of an ass and cart in a public area” and Pat Curley of Cloonakilla, Co. Westmeath who was charged with causing “malicious injury to a bicycle”.

Brian Donovan, Director of findmypast.ie, commented: “These court records open up a unique window into Irish society in the 19th century. Most families interacted with the law in one way or another, being perpetrators or victims of petty crime, resolving civil disputes, to applying for a dog licence. The records are full of the trauma and tragedy of local life, as family members squabbled, shop keepers recovered debt, and the police imposed order. These records help fulfil our mission to provide more than just names and dates, to get to the stories of our ancestors’ lives.”

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

Stellar Phoenix releases SQL Recovery V4

Software to repair severely damaged MS SQL server database that is now enhanced with upto 15% faster scanning engine.

Edison, NJ, February 22nd, 2012: Stellar Data Recovery a landmark for data recovery products and services today announced the release of Stellar Phoenix SQL Recovery version 4; software that repairs corrupt or damaged Microsoft SQL Server database (.mdf & .ndf) files in a safe and non-destructive manner. The new version is updated with features such as upto 15% faster scanning engine, improved support for SQL Server 2008 R2, full support for NDF Files and detailed preview.

“Database corruption is one of the biggest nightmares in the life of a Database administrator that can occur due scenarios like improper shutdown of SQL Server, sudden application exit or virus attack. It not only puts the data at risk, also threatens to take a toll on businesses and revenues. Stellar Phoenix SQL Recovery software is a complete solution that can deal with all possible instances of SQL Server failure and recovers the components from any damage either in .mdf or .ndf file.” said Mr. Sunil Chandna, CEO Stellar Data Recovery.

Stellar Phoenix SQL Recovery v4 uses powerful algorithms to perform thorough scan, gives an option of selective recovery, and repairs all your SQL Server Tables, Views, User Defined Functions, Stored Procedures, Triggers, Rules and Indexes. Additionally you can try the software available in a free download version to scan the damaged SQL databases and preview all the recoverable objects. Stellar Phoenix supports MS SQL Server 2008 R2, 2008, 2008*64, 2008 Express, 2005, 2005*64, Express, 2000, 2000*64, 7.0 and mixed formats.

Pricing and Availability

Stellar Phoenix SQL Recovery Version 4.0 is available for immediate download and is available at a starting price point of $349.

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

brightsolid and The British Library Publish 4 Million Pages Of Historical Newspapers Online

brightsolid and The British Library have announced the launch of a website that will transform the way that people use historical newspapers to find out about the past.

The British Newspaper Archive website will offer access to up to 4 million fully searchable pages, featuring more than 200 newspaper titles from every part of the UK and Ireland. The newspapers – which mainly date from the 19th century, but which include runs dating back to the first half of the 18th century – cover every aspect of local, regional and national news.

The website offers a wealth of material for people researching family history, including family notices and announcements and obituaries, while the ability to search by keyword/s, location, date and newspaper title means that people can search across hundreds of thousands of pages at a time as they track down that elusive ancestor. Searching the website generates free preview snippets of results found but users wishing to download full articles and images can pay to do so with a range of payment options available, including pay-per-view access for 48 hours or 30 days and a subscription package for a year. The website is free to use in the British Library’s reading rooms.

“The launch of the British Newspaper Archive website opens up the British Library’s newspaper collection as never before,” said Ed King, the British Library’s Head of Newspapers. “Rather than having to view the items on-site at the Library, turning each page, people across the UK and around the world will be able to explore for themselves the gold-mine of stories and information contained in these pages – and the ability to search across millions of articles will yield results for each user, that might previously have been the work of weeks or months, in a matter of seconds and the click of a mouse.”

The British Newspaper Archive is the result of a ten-year partnership between the British Library and brightsolid, announced in May 2010. Over the past 12 months, brightsolid’s digitisation team, based at the British Library Newspaper Library at Colindale, has been digitising up to 8,000 pages of historic newspapers every working day. The project is expected to scan up to 40 million newspaper pages over the next ten years. The site also offers high quality A1 prints.

Welcoming the new website, Ed Vaizey MP, Minister for Culture, Communications and Creative Industries, said: “The British Newspaper Archive is a rich and hugely exciting resource, packed with historical detail. It’s a great example of the public and private sectors collaborating to deliver something that neither party could have delivered by themselves. I searched for my own constituency of Wantage and within seconds had 42,000 results – an indication of the breadth and variety of material featured.”

The launch and further expansion of the British Newspaper Archive website will help the British Library to fulfil its strategic goals of long-term preservation of and access to the national newspaper collection, including old London newspapers. The Library’s newspaper strategy aims to secure the future of this unique resource by moving the hard-copy collections from the current building at Colindale to a purpose-built storage facility in Boston Spa, West Yorkshire. Access to the collection will be provided via microfilm and digital copies made available at the Library’s main site at St Pancras.

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

Findmypast.ie Launches Family Tree Builder

findmypast.ie has become the first Irish family history website to offer its users family tree builder software, greatly enhancing its offering to Irish family history enthusiasts.

One of the most important elements in researching family history is the ability to form a visual representation of the years of hard work and research. Findmypast.ie’s free online application allows users to easily create a family tree from scratch and add some of 10 million records now available on findmypast.ie to their existing research.

When compared to using traditional software, findmypast.ie’s web-based program presents many advantages such as allowing users to access the latest version of their family tree from any computer and share their family tree with invited members of their family or fellow researchers. Some of the main features of the software include:
– Add, edit, update and delete relations
– Add partners, parents and children
– Members can view their immediate family, ancestors, descendants or whole family tree

This is merely the first step in findmypast.ie’s development of a fully integrated family tree program on which users will be able to store photos and historical references, helping to preserve the story of their ancestors. Future features will also include greatly enhanced social functionality, such as the ability to search other users’ trees and inviting other users to collaborate on a tree.

Cliona Weldon, General Manager of findmypast.ie, comments: “Our family tree building software is equally adept at helping the novice family historian and experienced genealogist alike to store all the names on their family tree in one place. We’ve made the web based program as easy to use as possible and most importantly it’s free.”

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

Findmypast.co.uk Reveals Unusual Discoveries From Cheshire ‘s Local Records

Findmypast.co.uk has announced several unique discoveries found in the newly available local records from Cheshire. Workhouse records, parish registers, bishop’s transcripts and electoral registers from Cheshire went online for the first time ever recently in what findmypast.co.uk has titled ‘The Cheshire Collection.’ The collection is a series of over 10 million historic records provided by Cheshire Archives and Local Studies, covering over 350 years of history.

Some of the most interesting findings contained within The Cheshire Collection include:

– Lewis Carroll’s baptism was in Daresbury on11 July 1832
– An earthquake hit Cheshire on 18 March 1612
– Ancestors of James Bond actor Daniel Craig sold coal and were iron moulders

An unusual occurrence revealed in the records was the ‘peculiar marriage’ between Daniel Broadbent and Martha Cheetham in Mottram-in-Longdendale on 9 March 1780. Daniel was 23 and Martha was 83 years old. However, fate soon intervened to part this unlikely couple with the Mottram registers for the following year showing that Daniel Broadbent of Hattersley was buried on 30 May 1781. Furthermore, on 6 May 1776, 105 year-old George Harding married Jane Darlington, 75, at St Oswald, Chester.

These unusual marriage records show that, in the 18th century, one could find love at any age. However, the records also reveal a darker side of Cheshire’s past, telling several tales of death from the plague.

In 1625 the UK was hit by an outbreak of the plague which killed 35,000 people. Malpas in Cheshire was badly affected and the online records reveal harrowing accounts of those who were killed by the disease. One such example is that of Richard Dawson of Bradley, whose story, found among The Cheshire Collection, goes as follows:

“…being sick of the plague and perceiving that he must die at that time arose out of his bed and made his grave and caused his nephew to cast straw into the grave… and went and lay him down in the said grave, and caused clothes to be laid upon and so departed out of this world… he died about 28th august, this much I was credibly told.”

Family history records from the ancestors of Daniel Craig and the discovery of the Cheshire earthquake surprised Debra Chatfield, marketing manager at findmypast.co.uk. She commented: “These records make it possible for family historians and local history researchers to delve as far back as 1538, unearthing all sorts of unusual finds quickly and easily at their fingertips. Who would have known that Cheshire was hit by an earthquake in 1612 or that James Bond’s ancestors sold lumps of coal?”

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

findmypast.ie Aims To Help The Diaspora Discover Their Irish Roots

Findmypast.ie, the world’s newest family history site, is aiming to provide the 80 million people that are part of the Irish Diaspora with the easiest possible way of researching their Irish roots.

Findmypast.ie is a joint venture between brightsolid, the Scottish based experts in the digitisation of precious records who own and/or operate a family of sites including findmypast.co.uk, ScotlandsPeople.gov.uk as well as the Friends Reunited Group, and Eneclann, an award-winning Trinity College Campus Company based in Dublin. In 2009 Eneclann made it their objective to digitise what they felt was the greatest untapped Irish genealogical resource, The Landed Estate Court Rentals. They approached brightsolid online publishing with their proposal and from this, findmypast.ie was born.

Launched in Dublin in May by the Irish Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht Jimmy Deenihan, the new site aims to increase its current collection of records from almost 10 million to over 50 million within the next 12 months, making it the world’s most comprehensive online database for Irish family history research.

At the launch Brian Donovan, Director of findmypast Ireland, commented: “This is a major achievement. By teaming up with findmypast.co.uk and brightsolid, we are bringing Irish history to life for millions. These remarkable records are available online to researchers and family historians all over the world for future generations. We are committed to publishing family history records which provide more than simply names and dates, instead describing what your ancestors did and how they lived.”

One of the most significant set of records available on findmypast.ie is the Landed Estate Court Rentals records. Up until now, the biggest problem with the Landed Estate Court rentals has been access. Although used by professional Irish genealogists, the microfilm records stored at the National Archive of Ireland were difficult to use unless the name of an ancestor’s landowner was known.

With the permission of the National Archives and an agreement to allow free access to the digitised images in five years’ time, the 100,000 microfilm images were taken, digitised, indexed and placed online at findmypast.ie.

The critical information contained in these catalogues are the rentals, especially the lot descriptions. The details often include:

– Names of tenants
– Map reference
– Yearly rent in pounds, shillings and pence
– Day rent is due: labelled as “Gale days”
– Size of plot: in acres, roods and perches
– Length of tenure
– Observations

Previously, the amateur family historian would have been content to discover names and dates associated with their ancestors, but genealogists have now found new windows into the past. The Landed Estate Court records are an example of this as they provide not only names and dates but key facts about ancestors’ lives. These land and estate records include information on where they lived, who they lived with, what their lodgings were like and what the area in which they lived was like.

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

findmypast.ie Publishes Irish Prison Registers Online

findmypast.ie has launched the Irish Prison Registers 1790-1920 online for the first time, an untapped resource for those tracing their Irish roots.

The original Prison Registers, held at the National Archives of Ireland, cover all types of custodial institutions, from bridewells, to county prisons, to sanatoriums for alcoholics. They contain over 3.5 million entries, spread over 130,000 pages, with most records giving comprehensive details of the prisoner, including the name, address, place of birth, occupation, religion, education, age, physical description, name and address of next of kin, the crime committed, the sentence, dates of committal and release/decease.

The registers offer a real insight into 18th – 19th century Ireland and present evidence of a society of rebellion and social confrontation, where rioting and assault of police officers were everyday occurrences. They also reveal the rampant poverty and destitution that many faced, with the theft of everything from handkerchiefs to turnips.

The reasons for incarceration cover all types of crime but the most common offence was drunkenness, which accounted for over 30% of all crimes reported and over 25% of incarcerations. The top five offences recorded in the registers are:

– Drunkenness – 25%
– Theft – 16%
– Assault – 12%
– Vagrancy – 8%
– Rioting – 4%

The nature of these crimes was significantly different from those in England. Figures show that the rate of conviction for drunkenness and tax evasion was 3 times greater, and the rate of both destruction of property and prostitution were double what they were for the same time period in England.

The records are full of individuals who were arrested for very minor offences. For example, a record from the Cork City Gaol Court Book lists an arrest for Giles O’Sullivan (26), with no education and no previous convictions, on the 30th of March 1848 for being “a dangerous and suspicious character”. Other examples of the heavy hand of the law can be seen in the case of John Cunningham from Finglas (21) who was arrested for “Washing a car on a thoroughfare” and young Christopher Doyle (14) arrested “for being an idle, disorderly rogue and vagabond”.

With the Irish population averaging 4.08 million each year for this time period and over 3.5 million names in the records, it would suffice to say that almost every family in Ireland was touched by these records, as offenders, their relatives or victims of crime.

Brian Donovan, Director of findmypast Ireland, commented: “These records provide an invaluable resource for anyone tracing their Irish ancestors as during the period covered almost every household in Ireland had a convict in their family. These records provide such a wealth of information that they are sure to shock and surprise almost anyone looking for the missing links in their Irish family tree.”

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

Nothing’s Safe In Cyberspace Says Leo Impact Security

What do the NSA, the Army and Sony Corporation have in common with US embassies around the world? All of them, along with over 2,500 other entities, have been compromised by hackers like Wikileaks and Antisec. The cost of these cyber-crimes has mounted to over $3 billion a year. And “the little guy” isn’t safe, either. Everyone who uses the internet is at risk, despite the increasing use of antivirus software, IDS/IDP and firewalls in the current security models.

Today Leo Impact Security is exposing top secret methods used by cyber criminal’s also defending preventive methods because today all corporate, personal, and government computers are vulnerable to remote cyber attacks.

How do cyber criminals bypass current security model?

1. Antivirus bypass using crypters and protectors with random encryption methods
(ex: cypherx, Themida).
2. Firewall bypass using known ports in malware like port 80 and 8080.
3. IDS/IPS avoid using SSL encryption+ DNS tunneling-based malware (BOTS, RAT).
4. Remote access to any computer using Zero day exploits (.doc, .PPT, and .PDF individual files), Java silent driveway, browser packs, Router DNS MITM, and pen testing tools – Core impact, immunity canvas, Metasploit Pro etc.

For Proof of concepts/Live demos, check our site: http://www.leoimpact.com

How to defend against advanced cyber attacks?

Use m2 security model developed by cyber security expert Manish Kumar, chief research officer at Leo Impact. All of the following services are nonprofit as per our Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR).

1. World’s first free antivirus scanning online engine which protects your PC from viruses, trojans, spyware, rootkits, and other malicious programs (zero day exploits) and attachments by using 32+ antivirus on cloud. Visit: www.balajiplus.com

2. To protect against unknown malware (rootlets, trojans, BOTS-Zesus, spyeye, Ghostrat, etc.) and zero day exploits attacks using Neutron+ Protection system software in PC.

3. To protect against remote-based attacks like DDOS, Sql Injections, XSS, and buffer overflow, use cloudflare.com on servers and Free VPN providers ( www.usaip.euwww.vpnreactor.comwww.torproject.orgwww.hotspotshield.com )

4. To protect against data & information leakage and other attacks, use our two-way authentication and free security analysis and consultancy.

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

findmypast.ie Launches Online Irish Family History Forums

findmypast.ie has announced the launch of one of the first online forums solely dedicated to those researching their Irish family history. The forum is an online community for the Irish diaspora to discuss everything from researching Irish family history and Irish geography, to success stories and what it means to be Irish. Free to all registered users, it represents the findmypast family’s first foray into community based chat.

Recognising the inherent difficulties involved in looking for Irish ancestors, the forum gives amateur and professional family historians alike the opportunity to ask their questions to like-minded researchers across the globe. This will enable members to benefit from the experience gained from those who have previously hit brick walls in their research and overcome them.

Brian Donovan of findmypast Ireland and long-time member of the Irish genealogy community commented: “The findmypast.ie forum is another indication of findmypast’s dedication to providing the world’s best platform for researching your Irish family history. I wish there had been an option like this available to me when I first started in genealogy.”

The forums are divided into six different message boards, and any registered user can start a new discussion on the boards. It also allows users to add responses to topics which have already been posted by other users. The six message board topics include General Discussion, Using the Records, Tracing Specific Ancestors, Places and Geography in Ireland, Your Finds and Success Stories and What Does it Mean to be Irish?

The forum on findmypast.ie allows users to keep track of discussions and posts they’ve created or contributed to, which enables them to keep up with any discussions they are involved in. Users can also watch discussions which interest them but they are not involved in so that they can go back and read it at any time.

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

Findmypast.co.uk’s Merchant Navy Archives Reveal Photos Of UK ‘s Forgotten ‘Fourth Service’

Findmypast.co.uk has announced one million 20th century Merchant Navy Seamen records are now online for the first time ever.

The launch saw records of crew members of UK merchant ships from 1918 to 1941 made available online, including rarely seen photos of the mariners. This is the first time that many relatives will be able to see what their seafaring ancestor looked like and also learn more about the people who made up Churchill’s ‘fourth service’.

However, when asked what the Merchant Navy was, 54% of the British population couldn’t answer correctly, even though almost 90% have heard of them. This is a sad fact considering the Merchant Navy was integral to putting Britain on the trade and industry world map and were named by Churchill as Britain’s ‘fourth service’.

The navy records provide fascinating details about each individual mariner. The most complete records have extremely detailed descriptions, including hair and eye colour, height, and distinguishing marks such as tattoos.

The shocking gap in Britain’s general knowledge is highest amongst the younger generation – just 26% of those aged under 35 know what the Merchant Navy is, compared to a wiser 64% of over 55s. Many will therefore be surprised to learn that the Merchant Navy consists of all seagoing UK vessels with commercial interests and their crews.

So it may be a shock to many that at various points in the last millennium, Britain had the largest merchant fleet in the world. The workforce on these vessels was a casual, ‘jobbing workforce’ so in any one year as many as 1.5 million people could be employed in the Merchant Navy, meaning many people are likely to find ancestors in these records.

Debra Chatfield, Marketing Manager at findmypast.co.uk, commented: “This is the first time the UK Merchant Navy Seamen records, with their fascinating images of the mariners, have been made available online. Many people aren’t sure what the Merchant Navy is, even though a large proportion of the UK population will have Merchant Navy seamen in their ancestry. Hopefully these records will help fill the gaps and people will enjoy learning about what life was like for the brave, seafaring merchants who helped the island nation of Britain prosper.”

The Merchant Navy Seamen records are the only set of their kind available online and have been published in association with The National Archives. The military records show that the seamen who made up the Merchant Navy not only came from the UK, but from every continent, with large numbers from across the English-speaking world (notably the Maritime provinces of Canada), from the West Indies and Sierra Leone, and from Scandinavia, Somaliland, China and Japan. There are even some seamen from landlocked Switzerland.

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases

Findmypast.co.uk Launches More New Records And Lowers Prices

Findmypast.co.uk, a leading UK family history website, has been adding to its existing collection of over 40 million parish records for England & Wales dating back to 1538.

The company has launched over 18,000 baptism, marriage and burial records from London & Kent dating from 1825-1871, covering the parishes of Greenwich and Rotherhithe.

These follow hot on the heels of 79,842 parish records from Gwent (formerly Monmouthshire), spanning the years 1634 to 1933, which were also published on the site recently. These records cover the parishes of Chepstow, Shirenewton, Bedwellty, Beaufort, Mynddislwyn and Risca. Monmouth workhouse baptisms and burials are also included. Gwent Family History Society are providing these records on findmypast.co.uk as part of an on-going project between findmypast.co.uk and the Federation of Family History Societies to publish more parish records online, making it possible to trace back ancestors long before the start of civil registration in 1837.

20,000 burial records from the St Mary parish of Lambeth for 1819-1838 were also published online at findmypast.co.uk, supplied by East Surrey Family History Society, along with 128,000 burial records for the years 1802-1846 from the East Kent Burial Index.

Findmypast.co.uk has also announced the lowering of its prices, with full, annual subscriptions to the website, which allow access to all the historical records on the site, and annual foundation subscriptions both now cheaper than ever before. Both include the complete 1911 census for England & Wales.

Paul Yates, Head of findmypast.co.uk said: “We’re committed to making family history as affordable as possible, while still ensuring that we continue to deliver a steady stream of fascinating, new family history records to our customers every month.”

Via EPR Network
More Internet & Online press releases